plantbased

What is the dietary standard for a YOGI?

PaulHead200x200

The director, Paul Rodney Turner talks about the ancient tradition of prasadam distribution and food yoga and his new book The main purpose of my new book, FOOD YOGA – Nourishing Body, Mind & Soul is to introduce all people (Hindu and non-Hindu) to the concept of eating prasadam or high-vibrational, karma-free food. The word yoga means to unite, so in this sense we are talking about uniting body, mind and spirit, and ultimately connecting with the supreme spirit through the process of offering food and eating. However, much of my book also talks about what constitutes a healthy lifestyle for a budding yogi. For those already comfortable with the idea of sanctifying food, I point out that food yoga begins not at the offering altar, but in the growing and selecting of pure ingredients. In this sense, I  advocate that yogis should eat whole foods and stay away from processed foods and any food that has harmed the life of animals or the planet. My organisation, Food for Life Global stipulates that only such pure food should be served by our affiliates. I feel that ISKCON, a principle partner, has made a huge mistake in advocating commercial dairy as an acceptable part of their yogi diet in their temples, and it is our aim that their outreach project, Food for Life veers clear of this belief. In pursuance of this ideal, Food for Life Global does not financially support any FFL projects that serve commercial dairy. I consider myself a “Krishna-dairian,” or someone that will only consume milk from a protected cow who has willingly offered her milk to me with love and who has not been violated or inconvenienced in any way. Commercial milk cannot claim such purity and in my opinion, because of the circumstances surrounding its production, it should not be offered on […]