malnutrition

Food for Life Nepal reaching remote villages in need

Since no other relief agencies are reaching these areas, the people are highly appreciative of our efforts May 10, 2015, Kathmandu — Food for Life Global affiliate, Food for Life Nepal has been non-stop in the kitchen and on the streets of Kathmandu, Bhaktipur and many remote villages affected by the massive earthquake that struck on April 25. “Today we went to Dulal Village (20km away from our kitchen) to distribute food and relief materials received from Sahid Bhagavat Singh Comrade organization. The bad weather, prevented us visiting other places today,” explained Visvajit Vrajesa Das, director of the program. Volunteers provided 100 blankets to the residents of Dulal village at 3 different spots, along with 250 kgs of rice, 50 large bags of flour, and 300 packets of biscuits to the village children. Remote areas being served, where no other NGOs go To date, more than 90,000 people have been provided hot meals by Food for Life Nepal, while 400 families also received relief supplies. FFL Volunteers packed 2400 kgs of rice, dhal, blankets and clothing in flatbed trucks and drove to remote villages over damaged roads.  “Many of the families were in critical condition. Most of the houses were destroyed and people were starving,” reported Das. “We gave them blankets and then cooked them a delicious dinner on the spot. Volunteers are visiting remote villages like Majuwa, Ramkot, Tudikhel and Salyantar where often the roads are not paved and survivors are looking for grains in the rubble of the quake.  FFL Nepal is serving hot meals to the affected victims, especially to the children. They also sent a ton of food grains to the Dhading area and two tons of food grains to Gorkha. Food For Life Nepal also served hot meals to earthquake victims at the Thapapati VDC hospital wards, #1 and […]

Food for Life Vrindavan latest documentary

[youtube]http://youtu.be/eWEvWVDfvvs[/youtube] Made by Emmy award-winning producer Robyn Symon (http://symonproductions.com).Food for Life Vrindavan (FFLV) is a humanitarian aid organisation officially recognized by the Indian government and is one of the finest examples of Food for Life around the world. For the last ten years, FFLV has worked in the poorest villages in the Vrindavan area (120 Km south of New Delhi). serving million of healthy meals to children.  Their free school for the poor now cares for 1500 + young girls providing them a full education, three meals a day and medical care.  To support Food for Life Vrindavan, visit www.fflvrindavan.org 

Malnutrition – the great killer behind the curtain

Malnutrition is a far greater problem than world hunger. Why? Because even if a person gets sufficient quantities of food, they can still be undernourished and thus subject to chronic disease, if the food they consume does not provide the proper amounts of micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) to meet their daily nutritional requirements. In other words, being overweight does necessarily mean being well nourished. According to the UN Hunger report, nearly 870 million people, or one in eight, were suffering from chronic undernourishment in 2010-2012.  The vast majority of the hungry, 852 million, live in developing countries — around 15 percent of their population — while 16 million people are undernourished in developed countries. The FAO states that the world is increasingly faced with a double burden of malnutrition, with chronic undernourishment and micronutrient malnutrition co-existing with obesity, overweight and related non-communicable diseases (affecting more than 1.4 billion people worldwide). Poor nutrition causes nearly half (45%) of deaths in children under five – 3.1 million children each year. However, with much of the imagery related to these reports showing emaciated children in Africa and India, most people fail to realise that Obesity is another form of this same chronic problem. According to the United Nations Standing Committee on Nutrition (SCN) malnutrition is the largest single contributor to worldwide disease. In my travels to more than 65 countries I have seen a consistent pattern of poor eating habits and thus malnourishment, fueled by an all-too-convenient access to American fast food chains like McDonalds, Burger King and KFC. With heavy subsidization by the local government these junk food behemoths are able to entice, otherwise, well-meaning consumers to throw out common sense and choose foods that may satisfying their hunger and save them money in the short-term, but cost them thousands of dollars in medical bills and […]

Free lunch for 7000 proposed

buddhi-article

Mike Dinsdale 24th Jun 2013 12:00 PM A Northland religious group wants to give free lunches to the region’s 7000-plus students at low-decile schools and is about to go to the Government with a proposal for the scheme. The Hare Krishna community runs the Food For Life Centre in Whangarei that provides koha meals to the public and gives a free hot lunch to 350 students at Whangarei’s Manaia View and Otangarei Schools once a week. Whangarei Food For Life Centre co-ordinator Buddhi Wilcox said the centre was working on a proposal to put to the Government to extend its food-in-schools programme to provide free hot lunches to the 7000-plus students at low-decile primary schools in Northland. Mr Wilcox said Manaia View and Otangarei Schools were noticing the benefits of a free lunch for its students and Food For Life wanted to extend the programme to run along similar lines to Food For Life programmes overseas. In India one Food For Life Centre provides 100,000 free school meals every day, the centre providing half the money and the Indian Government the rest, and Mr Wilcox said providing a healthy, hot lunch to roughly 7000 students at low-decile Northland would cost about $2 for each meal. “We’d hope the Government could pay $1 of that and we would fundraise to pay the other $1. It’s not expensive, but it gives the students who need it most a hot, healthy meal,” he said. Mr Wilcox will ask Te Tai Tokerau MP Hone Harawira to take the centre’s proposal to the Government. Mr Harawira has his own Feed the Kids Bill before Parliament that focuses on ensuring every child at every decile-one to two school gets a decent breakfast and lunch. Manaia View School principal Leanne Otene said earlier that research showed a healthy […]

World Food Day – How about a new perspective?

World Food Day is celebrated every year around the world on 16 October in honor of the date of the founding of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations in 1945. The day is celebrated widely by many other organisations concerned with food security, including the World Food Programme. Background The World Food Day theme for 2012 is “Agricultural cooperatives – key to feeding the world”. World Food Day (WFD) was established by FAO’s Member Countries at the Organization’s 20th General Conference in November 1945. The Hungarian Delegation, led by the former Hungarian Minister of Agriculture and Food, Dr. Pál Romány has played an active role at the 20th Session of the FAO Conference and suggested the idea of celebrating the WFD worldwide. It has since been observed every year in more than 150 countries, raising awareness of the issues behind poverty and hunger. Despite the enormous efforts centred around World Food Day, with an aim to raise awareness of food security, amazingly, solving world hunger and creating food security seem to an elusive goal. Mortality According to Jean Ziegler(the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food for 2000 to March 2008), mortality due to malnutrition accounted for 58 percent of the total mortality in 2006: “In the world, approximately 62 million people, all causes of death combined, die each year. One in twelve people worldwide is malnourished and according to the Save the Children 2012 report, one in four of the world’s children are chronically malnourished.[115] In 2006, more than 36 million died of hunger or diseases due to deficiencies in micronutrients”.[116] According to the World Health Organization, malnutrition is the biggest contributor to child mortality, present in half of all cases.[117] Six million children die of hunger every year.[118] Underweight births and intrauterine growth restrictions cause 2.2 million child deaths […]