feeding the poor

Food for Life in Vrindavan

India has the largest number of poor children in Asia, with 80% of its 400 million youth severely deprived. In India, 60% of all children are classed as absolutely poor. Almost half of all children under the age of 5 are malnourished. Even as India continues to record impressive growth rates, poverty remains widespread and disparities deeply entrenched. The country is ranked 119th as per the 2010 Global Human Development Report, and according to the new poverty estimates, 37.2% of the national population and 41.8% of the rural population lives below the poverty line, states a report from the United Nations Development Programme for India. India’s Poverty Profile: At a Glance 37% of the population lives below the national poverty line. 41.8% of the rural population lives below the poverty line. 80% of the rural poor belong to the marginalised caste and tribal communities. More than 90% of the overall workforce is employed in the informal economy 96% of the women work in the informal economy 254 women per 100,000 births die due to maternity-related causes One non-governmental organisation is striving to do something about this disparity. Since 1990, Food for Life Vrindavan (an affiliate of Food for Life Global) has served over 5 million healthy vegetarian meals to the poorest children in India, along with a variety of other services including, free medical care from their own hospital, social development, vocational training, adult education, social entrepreneurship, women empowerment, legal assistance, martial arts, classical dance training for girls, tree planting, water well creation, and full educational services up to year 12 for over 1500 children at their four Sandipani Muni schools for the poor. HOW TO HELP [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f2rHwU0cmGg&feature=player_embedded[/youtube]

ISKCON Food Relief – simply the best in quality and quantity

Food for Life Global affiliate, ISKCON Food Relief Foundation has set the standard for quality nutritious lunches for school children. The organisation continues to expand its popular lunch service all throughout India. The fact that the non-profit can maintain such a high standard of quality, while serving over 250,000 meals daily is astonishing to say the least. THE SETTING Hunger and illiteracy are two of India’s most widespread and pressing problems. Although public schooling is offered free of cost to children aged 6–14, poverty bars the underprivileged from taking advantage. Typically hailing from slums and tribal areas, such children must either go hungry at school or resort to begging and child labor. In 2004, the Government of Maharashtra appointed Midday Meal to provide nutritional support for primary school children. The initiative aims to break the hunger cycle by providing impoverished families the incentive to keep their children in school—and off the streets. Midday Meal is a non-profit strategic program run for the benefit of all hungry students without consideration of caste, religion, or gender. For most children, it is their only complete meal of the day. THE IMPACT Numerous studies have demonstrated that there is a direct correlation between these lunch programs and increased student enrollment, attendance, attention spans, and exam scores. Other benefits include reductions in skin infection, anemia, and marked improvements in body mass index. STATE OF THE ART PROCESS Midday Meal’s four ISO-certified, custom-built kitchens mass-produce meals which are hygienic, nutritious, tasty, and cost-effective. To feed one student costs only ten cents per day, or $20.35 per school year. Midday Meal’s logistical infrastructure is a marvel of engineering ingenuity. Its unique solutions include: automated conveyor belt steam-jacketed cauldrons (660 lb. capacity) tamper-proof stainless steel containers computerized recipes flight-kitchen grade ventilation and drainage rack-fitted delivery vehicles 4 kitchens + 55 cooks + 69 vans + […]