Native American

Thanksgiving – a Day to Honor All Life

In the US, Thanksgiving is a time when families and friends come together to reaffirm their love and appreciation for one another through the age-old custom of sharing food. Americans will eat more than 50 million turkeys on this day. Why do Americans think it necessary to slaughter so many innocent animals to show their love for each other? It is a sad commentary on modern society that we have so much to be thankful for, and yet we carve up innocent animals on major holidays to express that sentiment. And at what expense? Americans are getting fatter and sicker year after year. The three top causes of death – heart disease, cancer and diabetes – are all food related. Eating a greasy, fat-laden dead bird is not going to help matters. But millions do it anyway, in the name of tradition. The origins of the Thanksgiving celebration are not as blessed as most people think. Thanksgiving is a quintessentially American holiday, so much so that it is often considered one of their holy days and is almost universally celebrated by Americans around the world. Ironically, in truth, American families get together to celebrate one genocide (against Native Americans) by committing another (against turkeys). How can people celebrate in good faith and conscience? On Thanksgiving Day, Americans give thanks for being the invader, the exploiter, the greedy, the colonizer, the thief, indeed the genocidaire. As Mark Twain points out in his War Prayer: Wishing and being thankful for one’s own success and victory is, at the very same time, wishing and being thankful for another’s defeat and destruction. Do Americans really want to make these kinds of wishes and give these kinds of thanks? I do not wish to belabor the disturbing history that Thanksgiving represents, mainly because most people […]