Online giving – Let your moral compass direct you

Online giving – Let your moral compass direct you

The end of year is time to consider making a gift to those that really need it. Even in economically challenging times like now, it is astonishing to see the consumer treadmill is running as good as ever. In fact, way better than expected according to a report by the Economic Times, “The holiday shopping season has turned out better than anyone expected. Sales from November through Saturday were up 2.5 per cent. Americans have spent $32 billion ($32,000,000,000) online, 15 per cent more than a year ago. Retails sales were up in November for the sixth month in a row. People are spending, in particular, on clothes, cars, electronics and furniture.”  If only one hundredth of 1% of that online spending or $3.2 million was directed to the work of volunteer-run charities like Food for Life Global, tremendous good could be done for millions of children. In fact, we could realistically serve more than 12.8 million kids! That’s right, for every dollar donated, FFLG could feasibly help provide at least 4 children a healthy hot meal from one of our projects around the world. That is over 400 children with every $100 donated. Why consider Food for Life Global over other agencies? Food for Life Global’s mission is uniting the world through pure food. Only the healthiest food is served by our affiliates in over 50 countries. No animal is harmed in the production of our food. All food is carefully designed by on-staff nutritionists and all cooks are volunteers. In other words, your donation is used with maximum efficiency and impact in mind and guided by a moral compass pointing towards compassion and health.Let your moral compass direct your charitable giving to a non-profit that has: Served the world since 1974 Is Volunteer run Has served over 1 […]

This holiday season, donate trees not animals

By HEATHER FARAID DRENNAN / People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals Source: The Bellingham Herald With the holidays fast approaching, most of us are receiving solicitations for a variety of charitable programs, some good, some not so good. I would include animal-donation programs – in which a cow or a goat or some other animal is given to an impoverished family overseas – in the latter category. When I was about 10 years old, my mother volunteered to milk goats at a farm near our home in Massachusetts. It was a noble sentiment in theory, but in practice it involved weekly ordeals with feisty, intelligent goats, each of whom had her own plan of resistance when it came to getting them into the milking pen. Once a goat was in the pen, it was my job to try to distract the animal so that my mother could get the milking done without getting kicked or having the pail kicked over, spilling all her hard-fought milk on the barn floor. I imagine her reaction would not have been one of gratitude had someone presented her with a “full-time” goat. But daily tussles with goats are the least of the problems that impoverished families have to face when animal-donation programs foist animals upon them. Organizations that send animals to families may mean well, but they do not provide a sustainable solution for global hunger. World Land Trust called these programs “environmentally unsound and economically disastrous.” Grazing animals often cause topsoil runoff and land degradation, which can exacerbate the problems of drought-prone areas, and growing plants for animal consumption is a much more inefficient use of resources than growing plants for people to eat directly. For families on the receiving end of animal-donation programs, the animal is just another mouth to feed. […]