A Food for Life Hero

A Food for Life Hero

Mahasringha Das is a legend in many parts of the world, especially in the villages surrounding Mayapur in India, where he has been cooking and serving hundreds of thousands of impoverished Bengali’s for 17 years. I have known Mahasringha for 18 years when I first came across him in Poland. He was a legend then, cooking a feast for 400 people in a kitchen one could barely stand in and then serving the delicious meal to hungry people on the streets of Warsaw. To my amazement, as soon as he completed this monumentus task day in day out, he would throw a bag over his shoulder containing Indian scripture and would spend the next 3 hours sharing what he had read that morning. A few years later he found himself in India. His apartment kitchen was replaced by a hole in the ground and his spice rack by the fresh herbs and spices growing in the forests where he worked. Hauling huge cast iron woks onto these holes he would start a wood fire and cook what the village people considered, “Food of the Gods.” Over time, he trained the men, women and children to assist him in the cooking so that together they could feed more and more people. It was not uncommon for thousands to gather to experience these free vegetarian feasts. Following the tradition, Maha would encourage the Bengali villagers to sing with him before and after the feast, transforming the once sedate village scene into a veritable festival of food and dance. Mahasringha couldn’t contain his enthusiasm to share the love in his heart, so for 3 – 4 months of the year he would travel outside of India to Europe, Middle East, USA and Canada sharing the culture of spiritual hospitality he had become so […]

Food for Life in Vrindavan

India has the largest number of poor children in Asia, with 80% of its 400 million youth severely deprived. In India, 60% of all children are classed as absolutely poor. Almost half of all children under the age of 5 are malnourished. Even as India continues to record impressive growth rates, poverty remains widespread and disparities deeply entrenched. The country is ranked 119th as per the 2010 Global Human Development Report, and according to the new poverty estimates, 37.2% of the national population and 41.8% of the rural population lives below the poverty line, states a report from the United Nations Development Programme for India. India’s Poverty Profile: At a Glance 37% of the population lives below the national poverty line. 41.8% of the rural population lives below the poverty line. 80% of the rural poor belong to the marginalised caste and tribal communities. More than 90% of the overall workforce is employed in the informal economy 96% of the women work in the informal economy 254 women per 100,000 births die due to maternity-related causes One non-governmental organisation is striving to do something about this disparity. Since 1990, Food for Life Vrindavan (an affiliate of Food for Life Global) has served over 5 million healthy vegetarian meals to the poorest children in India, along with a variety of other services including, free medical care from their own hospital, social development, vocational training, adult education, social entrepreneurship, women empowerment, legal assistance, martial arts, classical dance training for girls, tree planting, water well creation, and full educational services up to year 12 for over 1500 children at their four Sandipani Muni schools for the poor. HOW TO HELP [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f2rHwU0cmGg&feature=player_embedded[/youtube]